(a)musing Greg

benolen:

Space: You Are Here poster series by Mike Gottschalk

emergentfutures:

Paul Higgins: Great to see someone with such serious credentials willing to poke fun to get a point across

robertreich:

Comedy video for my son, Sam.

Last week engineers from the University of Southampton built a drone aircraft from parts printed on a 3D laser printing machine. They entered each part’s specifications and the machine printed out all the pieces by building up layers of plastic or metal until each part was complete. Then they took the parts and snapped them together in minutes like a simple airplane model and they had themselves an unmanned air vehicle (UAV). Add a battery and a piloting system and you’re ready to go. From nothing to airborne in a day.
 
Very cool. And it scared the hell out of me.
(via Is 3D Printing Technology a Supervillain’s Best Friend? Or How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Drone | Esoterica | Big Think)  Yes, everybody is gradually becoming empowered to build everythings that exists in somebody’s mind. And it is not going to stop. We are step by step entering a world where institutions can not anymore protect itself or citizens from what individuals can do. For good and for bad…
Last week engineers from the University of Southampton built a drone aircraft from parts printed on a 3D laser printing machine. They entered each part’s specifications and the machine printed out all the pieces by building up layers of plastic or metal until each part was complete. Then they took the parts and snapped them together in minutes like a simple airplane model and they had themselves an unmanned air vehicle (UAV). Add a battery and a piloting system and you’re ready to go. From nothing to airborne in a day.
 
Very cool. And it scared the hell out of me.
(via Is 3D Printing Technology a Supervillain’s Best Friend? Or How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Drone | Esoterica | Big Think) Yes, everybody is gradually becoming empowered to build everythings that exists in somebody’s mind. And it is not going to stop. We are step by step entering a world where institutions can not anymore protect itself or citizens from what individuals can do. For good and for bad…

poptech:

itsfullofstars:

What the Planets would look like in our sky if they were as close as the Moon

We recommend watching this one full screen. 

The US budget is like a 1st grader playing Oregon Trail. Spend all the money on ammunition so you can shoot at stuff, then wonder why your wagon is falling apart and everyone is dying of dysentery.
Malhavoc430 // Reddit (via mattchew03)

Few battles in history have been more scrutinized than Gettysburg’s three blood-soaked days in July 1863, the turning point in the Civil War. Still, there were questions that all the diaries, official reports and correspondence couldn’t answer precisely. What, for example, could Gen. Robert E. Lee actually see when he issued a series of fateful orders that turned the tide against the Confederate Army nearly 150 years ago?

Now historians have a new tool that can help. Advanced technology similar to Google Earth, MapQuest and the GPS systems used in millions of cars has made it possible to recreate a vanished landscape. This new generation of digital maps has given rise to an academic field known as spatial humanities. Historians, literary theorists, archaeologists and others are using Geographic Information Systems — software that displays and analyzes information related to a physical location — to re-examine real and fictional places like the villages around Salem, Mass., at the time of the witch trials; the Dust Bowl region devastated during the Great Depression; and the Eastcheap taverns where Shakespeare’s Falstaff and Prince Hal caroused.

Like the crew on the starship Enterprise, humanists are exploring a new frontier of the scholarly universe: space.

Mapping spatial information reveals part of human history that otherwise we couldn’t possibly know,” saidAnne Kelly Knowles, a geographer at Middlebury College in Vermont. “It enables you to see patterns and information that are literally invisible.” It adds layers of information to a map that can be added or taken off at will in various combinations; the same location can also be viewed back and forth over time at the click of a mouse.

IAH3 Libatique 73 Lens, Kodot XGrizzled Film, No Flash, Taken with Hipstamatic

IAH3

Libatique 73 Lens, Kodot XGrizzled Film, No Flash, Taken with Hipstamatic
IAH2 Libatique 73 Lens, Kodot XGrizzled Film, No Flash, Taken with Hipstamatic

IAH2

Libatique 73 Lens, Kodot XGrizzled Film, No Flash, Taken with Hipstamatic
IAH Libatique 73 Lens, Kodot XGrizzled Film, No Flash, Taken with Hipstamatic

IAH

Libatique 73 Lens, Kodot XGrizzled Film, No Flash, Taken with Hipstamatic